Children's books and book reviews - reading resource for kids, teachers, librarians, parents

Beginning readers book reviews for developing, emerging and fluent readers



*Do You Know Tigers?* by Alain Bergeron, Michel Quintin and Sampar - beginning readers book review
Also by Alain M. Bergeron:
Do You Know the Rhinoceros?
Do You Know Crocodiles?
Do You Know Toads?
Do You Know Spiders?
Do You Know Chameleons?
Do You Know Rats?
Do You Know Porcupines?
Do You Know Crows?
Do You Know Leeches?

 
Also illustrated by Michel Quintin:
Do You Know the Rhinoceros?
Do You Know Crocodiles?
Do You Know Toads?
Do You Know Spiders?
Do You Know Chameleons?
Do You Know Rats?
Do You Know Porcupines?
Do You Know Crows?
Do You Know Leeches?

 
Also illustrated by Sampar:
Do You Know the Rhinoceros?
Do You Know Crocodiles?
Do You Know Toads?
Do You Know Spiders?
Do You Know Chameleons?
Do You Know Rats?
Do You Know Porcupines?
Do You Know Crows?
Do You Know Leeches?

 
Do You Know Tigers?
by Alain Bergeron, Michel Quintin and Sampar
Ages 7-10 64 pages Fitzhenry and Whiteside August 2015 Paperback    

Compared to Do you Know the Rhinoceros?, this book has more of a storyline.

Facts about the animal are still paired with funny comic-like illustrations, but in this book, the first ten pages read like a continuing comic strip about a cat, a dog, and a tiger (who ends up in jai). Facts about behavior, habitat, mating, poaching, and appearance appear along the bottom of the page, but the majority of the page is devoted to the illustrations and dialogue between the animal characters.

Although the facts can be taken seriously, Samparís anthropomorphic illustrations are drawn with embellishments. On the double-page spread that talks about a tigerís diet (It is common for a tiger to eat 30-50 kilograms/65-110 pounds of meat in a single meal), Sampar has drawn a tiger sitting in a bush by a fast food restaurant. Heís placing his order in the drive-thru. ďI said 400 quarter-pound hamburgers, with extra bacon and no pickles!Ē The tigers have long claws and teeth and menacing eyes, but they donít look too vicious because they wear clothes and behave as we do.

This is a useful addition to the series because most kids like big cats.
 
Beginning readers book reviews for developing, emerging and fluent readers

click here to browse children's board book reviews
click here to browse children's picture book reviews
click here to browse young readers book reviews
click here to browse young readers book reviews
click here to browse young adult book reviews
click here to browse parenting book reviews
 
web reviews
  Tanya Boudreau/2015 for curled up with a good kid's book  






For grown-up fiction, nonfiction and speculative fiction book reviews,
visit our sister site Curled Up With a Good Book (www.curledup.com)